Category Archives: In the News

Newsweek My Favorite Mistake Sherry Rehman on the time she forgot about school. By Sherry Rehman | From the Oct. 21‚ 2011‚ issue. Our work defines who we are, and I would be lost without an all-consuming job. I don’t dwell on regrets because each experience is a learning opportunity, but I do remember one episode with particular sharpness, as it changed my life and career trajectory. My daughter, Marvi, is the axis of my world. She was born just after I took over as editor of Herald. To juggle being a supermom and career woman, I had to set clear boundaries: I eschewed all conferences outside the country until she was in high school, one parent would drop her to school and the other would pick her up no matter what, and we would have at least one meal together every day and talk about our day. These were…

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Sherry assumes charge of PRCS chairperson Staff Report Daily Times, October 11, 2011 ISLAMABAD: Former Information Minister and Member National Assembly (MNA) Sherry Rehman has assumed the charge of Pakistan Red Crescent Society (PRCS) Chairperson. President Asif Ali Zardari, who is also PRCS President, has appointed Sherry Rehman as chairperson for a period of three years. On her first visit to the PRCS National Headquarters, Sherry held meetings with the management and staff members of the Society. PRCS Secretary General Muhammad Ilyas Khan gave a detailed presentation to the chairperson about the PRCS relief activities. Sherry appreciated the work of PRCS to mitigate the sufferings of the vulnerable and urged to expedite the relief and recovery operation in the rain affected areas of Sindh. She asked the PRCS officials to install more water filtration plants and to ensure immediate delivery of medicines in the affected areas. She also asked for…

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The Sydney Morning Herald September 8, 2011 Paul McGeough, Islamabad TO CAMP at the crossroads of courage and recklessness is to live dangerously. To stay put after two stalwart allies have been murdered requires the nerves of steel that are immediately apparent on meeting Sherry Rehman. She is a woman who knows something about pressure politics – Pakistani style. The striking 50-year-old, no-nonsense Pakistani MP glides across the marbled floors of her heavily guarded villa in Islamabad and folds herself into the upholstered club chair. Above her is a portrait of a veiled Benazir Bhutto – on the opposite wall, a Picasso lithograph and a Miro. Ms Rehman was travelling in the campaign convoy of the former prime minister in 2007 when a gunman shot Ms Bhutto before detonating a suicide bomb. Ms Rehman says: ”We all were injured in the blasts. You only worry about being maimed. It’s the…

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HINDUSTAN TIMES APRIL 15, 2011 ‘Reforming laws that misuse Islam not anti-religion’ Yashwant Raj, Hindustan Times Former Pakistani information minister Sherry Rehman is high up on the list of al Qaeda targets because of a bill she introduced in 2010 making the punishment for blasphemy lighter than it is currently — 10 years in jail to death punishment. She became what has been described as a “prisoner of intolerance”. But she has not given up on her bill or her convictions. She spoke to Hindustan Times — the first time to an Indian newspaper after the recent concerns about her security — on the sidelines of an international conference on US-Islam relations in Washington. How did it feel to be house-bound (because of threats against your life)? It’s over now. I am going everywhere. I have enhanced security. It’s par for the course. But I do believe that certain political…

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The Christian Science Monitor January 28, 2011 Could there be a liberal resurgence in Pakistan? Lawmaker Sherry Rehman says she’s working on it. A liberal resurgence in Pakistan may not be as unlikely as it might seem, according to Sherry Rehman, a progressive parliamentarian who is attempting to amend the country’s blasphemy laws. By Issam Ahmed, Correspondent Karachi, Pakistan Liberal Pakistani lawmaker Sherry Rehman left a comfortable life researching a book in London to fight for liberty in her homeland. Now she’s under siege, confined to her Karachi home ever since the assassination of liberal icon Salman Taseer three weeks ago. Rehman and the former governor of Punjab Province both opposed Pakistan’s blasphemy law, which makes derogatory remarks toward Islam a capital offense. Both claimed the law is used to carry out vendettas against minorities such as Christians and Ahmadi Muslims. In the eyes of Pakistan’s religious political parties, known…

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